Book Review: Crazy Love by Francis Chan

18 thoughts on “Book Review: Crazy Love by Francis Chan”

  1. Joe, this book sounds like its addressing some of the key issues I’m wrestling with as a believer and a church elder. I’m looking forward to picking up a copy in the days to come. Thanks for your recommendation!

  2. Heather,
    I appreciate your question. I read crazy love late last summer and since that time have had to make some really tough decisions and choices. I think the biggest thing that helped me in those times was the freedom that I found in this book. I base so much of what I do on pleasing someone. My “boss”, my peers, my family. I think the biggest thing that I took away from this book and have really let God change my life with is natural purpose. The fact that I was created to delight in him. The freedom to shed a life chasing after approval from others and the ability to see the relentless love that God has for me and what my natural response would be to that. With that purpose, I’ve found more bravery and courage to take steps or pursue the things that God has for me but that seem crazy to the world

  3. I felt this book triggers spirit wounds of guilt and legalism, too in allignment with ‘old time religion.’ This book more problem focused than solution focused, more sin than grace, which is painful for today’s christian who is needing to be led to repentance by kindness not a wake up call, but His gracious attitude. THis is not one I would reccomend to anyone, b/c it sends the wrong message, one that is not of the freedom that is already ours.

  4. ab….

    I read this book and felt that the whole time Chan pointed back to the new testament scriptures. It’s totally based on the bible. If that is considered “old time religion” then we are indeed in trouble as christians if we can’t handle black and white truth. When I finished this book I was inspired to definitely change and I believe Chan made a point of not making it legalist. For pity’s sake it’s called Crazy Love. Not Crazy Legalism. Even James said in the bible that “faith without action is dead”. We can’t say “yeah we have grace,” and not have a huge responsibility to it. Sometimes when we ourselves are living under legalism, we read it anywhere, many times even out of the bible. I know I personally have struggled with this in my life. My question to you is, did this book draw it out for you? Or is it simply you?

  5. I’m in a study right now that’s going through this book. I’ve only gotten through the first 3 chapters but I’m really enjoying it so far. When I first started it, I felt a similar feeling as you expressed, not wanting to be guilted into doing whatever the author wants me to do. But he does a good job of not doing that it seems. Thanks for the good review!

  6. I think Francis Chan is taking us backwards. It just loads another huge burden on people that are carrying a ton on their shoulders as it is. You are saved by grace, period.

  7. This book was really good. It took passages from the bible and put it to use. The point is, God wants your all, and if your not giving it to him, well then…. He would rather you be hot or cold… Luke warm doesnt cut it. He wants all of you, and this book addresses that.

  8. I bought this book yesterday, and am already prepared to heave it into the recycle bin. I believe that if people stick with reading and apply the Bible, rather than man’s watered-down take on that very Word, the Christian walk would have far more authenticity.

    I stopped short of reading Chan’s book when he referred to “…used tampons…” as being the most disgusting thing he could imagine. It’s true that scripture containing the words, “filthy rags” does refer to a woman’s menstrual cycle (Strong’s Concordance). However, I can think of many things that are far more offensive; for example, Chan’s opinion of a younger woman’s monthly bodily function; or more accurately, men’s low opinion of women in general. Indeed, if it weren’t for God having created woman, Chan wouldn’t even exist!

  9. Our Sunday School class just finished reading Crazy Love and we are searching for what to read next. Any suggestions?
    Thank you.

  10. Pat,

    Chan’s use of “used tampons” is exactly as you described…directly out of the Bible in reference to our supposed righteous acts. Not sure God’s intent was to demean women when God said that our righteous acts are likened unto filthy rags. But it does indeed bring up vivid imagery in how we should regard our supposed righteous acts. And I think Chan was dead on in his exegesis of what God had to say on the subject. Thanks for listening.

  11. The comments here are similar to those on Amazon. Some loved the book taking it as a kick in the seat of the pants to uncommitted Christians. Others, like me, took away from the book a very judgmental condemning spirit, leaving the reader with the feeling that only Super-Christians will make it to heaven! I also felt that the exegesis of certain key Bible passages was shallow and incorrect. I wrote an article entitled “Balanced Love” in response to the book. If anyone is interested in reading it, you can access it at:
    http://www.freegracealliance.com/articles.htm

  12. “I stopped short of reading Chan’s book when he referred to “…used tampons…” as being the most disgusting thing he could imagine. It’s true that scripture containing the words, “filthy rags” does refer to a woman’s menstrual cycle (Strong’s Concordance). However, I can think of many things that are far more offensive; for example, Chan’s opinion of a younger woman’s monthly bodily function; or more accurately, men’s low opinion of women in general. Indeed, if it weren’t for God having created woman, Chan wouldn’t even exist!”

    Thank you, Pat! I was deeply offended at this when I read it as well, so I researched a little it and found out that the rendition “filthy rags” escaped the actual text. If it were true to the text it would merely read “menstrual rags” (notice there is no “disgusto” factor), referring to a ritual impurity as described in Leviticus 15:19-33. What has happened here is that the translators have replaced a Hebrew metaphor with an different English expression – and one, I might add, that is very demeaning to women and deeply hurtful.

    It would appear that only the modern translators consider the female reproductive cycle to be “filthy” as even all the ancient texts simply read “menstrual rags.”

    I have a hard time believing Francis Chan would be able to look his sweet beloved daughter in the face as she is maturing and beginning her menses, only to be told the beautiful and fearful design of her reproductive cycle – indeed, her feminity – is something to be disgusted with. I hope he realizes at some point how derrogatory this statement is.

  13. I thought the reference to “used tampons” was out of place, unneeded, and plain distasteful. He could have simply let the text speak for itself instead of expounding on such a graphic image. It’s just not something I would want to hear from a respectible Christian, especially in the book they wrote. Imagine Billy Graham, Charles Stanley, Adrian Rogers, etc saying that? Kind of appauling IMO. Not to mention, I thought the chapter it was in (Crazy Love) missed the point.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *